Why raw derelict buildings and interiors should not be dismissed…

It might cost more and it might not be to everyone's taste, but tearing a building down or covering old derelict surfaces with new skin might not be the most appealing solution. The trend, in for example China, has been to tear down rather than to preserve. The learnings, from for example a post-war Berlin, are that preserving half-ruined buildings and their interiors and combining them with modern interiors and fittings can create a much more intricate and personal experience.  The old and raw materials, treated and made structural safe, creates not only a beautiful canvas but also conserves and shows the past while combining it with the present.  Here follows a few beautiful examples from around the world:

It might cost more and it might not be to everyone's taste, but tearing a building down or covering old derelict surfaces with new skin might not be the most appealing solution. The trend, in for example China, has been to tear down rather than to preserve. The learnings, from for example a post-war Berlin, are that preserving half-ruined buildings and their interiors and combining them with modern interiors and fittings can create a much more intricate and personal experience.

The old and raw materials, treated and made structural safe, creates not only a beautiful canvas but also conserves and shows the past while combining it with the present.

Here follows a few beautiful examples from around the world:

The Waterhouse, Shanghai, China:

This was once the Japanese Army headquarters in Shanghai, built around the 1930's. The restored original concrete building has an addition built over the existing structure. The addition uses Cor-Ten steel that reflects the industrial past of this working dock by Huangpu River.
The Neri & Amp Hu architects has blended the interior and exterior, as well as the public and the private areas. Creating a intricate and exiting mix of usage and visions. The past is present in every part of the building while todays comfort integrates beautifully.

The Between time showcase:

This installation was during 6 weeks open to the public. It was a elaborated constellation of fine furnishings, unique vintage designs and contemporary art in one of Berlins remaining 19th century architecture time capsules. By the curators Pöppler &amp Hofstetter.

Hotel Anteroom, Kyoto, Japan:

In an old student dormitory. The design was making use of the existing building and to remake existing fixtures. A lot of the furniture was also made out of reused materials. The bare usage of building and furniture materials such as concrete, metal, glass and stone gives a modern and peaceful presence.

Mercato, Shanghai, China:

Another example from the Neri&Hu architects in Shanghai. This time it in the center of the 1900s Shanghai industrial hub – the Bund.
The beam structure of this the oldest steel-framed building in Shanghai was unmasked and the inside space stripped, leaving the brickwork exposed while the peeling plaster and Victorian ceilings moldings was kept intact.

Appartamento al Mantova:

This appartment in Mantova was less of a challenge but where the brickwork and old ceramic tiles creates a dramatic effect

Tel Aviv Restaurant